A Passing Visitor

In our previous residence we were besieged by pigeons – those town pigeons, feral pigeons, which the RSPB call Rock Doves which sounds much nicer than they are.  We ended up putting spikes on our window sills.

Today we thought we might be able to add species number 41 to our bird list when our first pigeon (not counting Wood Pigeons) was sighted.  It seemed to want to take up residence with the young hens.  Closer examination showed a leg-ring and it was clear it was a slightly confused racing pigeon.  It was obviously in search of love and corn.

2015_05_31_04

Details have been lodged with the RPRA.

Meanwhile, the insert for the woodland structure is taking shape

2015_05_31_01
2015_05_31_02

….

2015_05_31_05
2015_05_31_06
2015_05_31_07
2015_05_31_08

….

some chicks are getting very big

2015_05_31_03

Advertisements

Bird Life

Having a visit from our totally qualified and certified bird handler today we were able to take a peep at the content of some of our nestboxes.  Blue Tit and Flycatcher chicks:

2015_05_30_E01
2015_05_30_E02
2015_05_30_12
2015_05_30_13

The Flycatcher continues to be a bold and fascinating presence on the plot

2015_05_30_E03

Today he was witnessed exhibiting an interesting behaviour – peeping into Blue Tit nests

2015_05_30_10

There is research on this – it is thought that is a migrant incomer he has not quite got his finger on the pulse of current gossip: state of food supplies, recent temperatures, and inspects other nests to see if it might be time to lay some eggs.

The Robins have been spending all their time trying to keep fledglings satisfied

2015_05_30_E04

Back and forth to the mealworm feeder making beelines back to the offspring.

Some birds are less shy

2015_05_30_E05

Green shoots; fresh ideas

The resown field is pushing up green shoots

2015_05_26_01

and green shoots also emerging in our minds as we make the second inspirational visit of the week.  Today 80 miles south to relations – out of touch for ever until a common motivation brings us back together.  Spending time with  people who have been ploughing the furrow ahead of us is so heartening – we see hugelkulture beds and learn about infrared heating plus seeing more cockerels than should ever be in the same place at the same time.  Drive home brimming with new ideas.

2015_05_26_02

and why was a frog in our kitchen?

2015_05_26_03