They tell us it is not always like this

There is a weather station 10 km south-east of us, here are its rainfall records for November over the last five years:

2010

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2011

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2012

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2013

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and 2014

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… an average of 75.38 mm

Here is November ending today

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Very close to double the average of the last five years and 64% above the wettest year in that time.  (As I write the total for this month has risen to 145.2 mm and there is still an hour to go!)

One of the many benefits of being responsible for animals is that we don’t choose whether to go outside or not each day, we have a duty of care

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We keep reassuring ourselves that mud might be a problem for us

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but Spot and Bert don’t see it as an issue

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as long as they have nice dry houses with plenty of straw (or breakfast as Spot sees it)

Meanwhile everything glistens

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Clodagh arrives

I am not sure what to think of the latest ruse to give these winds names.  We had Abigail, then we had Barney and now we have Clodagh.  I see we can now anticipate winds to come

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I don’t think I see these winds as individuals, more as one register on the complex range of outdoor experiences.

So today was very windy, not cold enough to chill the fingers, and the rain came in squalls rather than torrents.

Spot had eaten, or otherwise destroyed, all her straw bedding

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And while Bert had been more conservative of his

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he was still being a little stoic.

We gave them each a new straw bale.  Bert used his to make a barricade

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but also brought his feed bucket down to ensure bed and breakfast.

Spot thought the straw was breakfast

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although she will always be ready for any extras

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Meanwhile Codagh bent the trees

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and the neighbouring sheep either jealously eyed up the house

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our huddled beneath our hedge

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Those with a lower profile were less ruffled

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Pethan eraill yn y tyddyn heddiw:

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November’s dying days

A moment of calm at Gribin Isaf today

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We take in a wood load against future chills

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As the ducks hold a protective cordon

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We wonder if the peeping snowdrops will survive their patrols

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Down in the pig pens Spot is enjoying her last few weeks before she needs to start making piglets

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Bert can’t wait

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Pethan eraill yn y tyddyn heddiw:

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Warm moon, warm pigs

After the dip into frost a few days ago November seems to have resumed its mild(ish) wet(ter) course.

As the full moon rises over Gribin Isaf tonight

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the outside temperature is over eight degrees and the forecast for the foreseeable future mainly looks like this

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It surely will get colder and we are discovering that pigs get through a lot of straw.  We give them a nice new bale and they spend a long time fashioning it into a draught proof, body hugging bed – then they eat it… or push it outside, leaving bare boards and a pathetic look.

So a further delivery today

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The ducks have appointed themselves gate-keepers whose job is to inspect all goods inwards.

Having completed the hen run walls work continues to net the top to deter opportunistic daytime foxes and maybe hungry pheasants

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Shelia keeps a watchful eye on proceedings

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Property Market

Another misty soggy November morning

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and the ducks come up to inspect the chickens’ new home

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a couple of pheasants come by to view the empty property vacated by Floppy and Co

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The sheep next door wear with pride their tupping mark, a sign of next spring’s new life.

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This year still ekes out its life:

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in some cases, a little surprising

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Pethan eraill yn y tyddyn heddiw:

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Today we have been mainly looking into the distance

As the snow lingers on the mountain tops, new patterns of light and dark are revealed

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Sometimes the random spotlight of sunlight picks out previously unseen detail

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Back on the plot the chickens are getting to know their new run

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Floppy and his wives, Jenny and Claire, keep close together

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in the face of Shelia and Fanny with their entourage

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Floppy may be envious of Fanny’s plumage

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But he relies on Claire to spot odd bits of food left on his wattle

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and to clean them up for him

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Fresh whiteness

We all awake to a sprinkle of fresh whiteness

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For some that is a cause for slight consternation

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For Floppy and his harem of two

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and for Shelia and Fanny and their entourage

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the consternation was more that they were confined to barracks as the cold clear day was an opportunity to build a new hen run and bring all three cockerels together in one happy community.

Floppy and his women kept close together

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and Shelia did a dance of disdain

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Tomorrow we will see how they will all live together.

Pethan eraill yn y tyddyn heddiw:

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